Femtocell

What is a femtocell?

Femtocell diagram

Femtocells are low-power wireless access points that operate in licensed spectrum to connect standard mobile devices to a mobile operator’s network using residential DSL or cable broadband connections.

Why another access device for the home?

Well it’s clear more and more consumers want to use mobile phones in the home, even when there’s a fixed line available. Friends and family usually call a mobile number first, and it’s where messages and contact lists are stored.

However, it is often the case that providing full or even adequate mobile residential coverage is a significant challenge for operators.

From a competitive perspective, femtocells are important because mobile operators need to seize residential minutes from fixed providers, and respond to emerging VoIP and WiFi offerings.

Improving user experience in the home is also essential for reducing churn and gaining marketshare and new revenues. However, high deployment costs ensure that 3G networks rarely extend beyond the regulatory minimum.

Using femtocells solves these problems with a device that employs power and backhaul via the user’s existing resources. It also enables capacity equivalent to a full 3G network sector at very low transmit powers, dramatically increasing battery life of existing phones, without needing to introduce WiFi enabled handsets.

More details available here

Twitter now with geotagging

In August Twitter announced that they were working on a new API that would provide developers with the ability to geotag tweets. The Geotagging API is officially available now.


The latest release is unique in that it’s API-only which means you won’t see any changes on twitter.com, yet. Instead, Twitter applications like Birdfeed, Seesmic Web, Foursquare, Gowalla, Twidroid, Twittelator Pro and others are already supporting this new functionality (go try them out now!) in interesting ways that include geotagging your tweets and displaying the location from where a tweet was posted. The added information provides valuable context when reading your friends tweets and allows you to better focus in on local conversations. Now you can find out what live music is playing right now in your neighborhood or what people visiting Checkpoint Charlie are saying today about the anniversary of the Berlin Wall. These are only the beginning and we are really looking forward to seeing the creative uses emerge from the developer community.

It’s important to note geotagging is disabled by default for all users which means you will need to opt-in in order to use it. To activate the new geotagging functionality, go to your Settings page and click “Enable Geotagging”

via Mtaram

All day staring at the ceiling
Making friends with shadows on my wall
All night hearing voices telling me that
I should get some sleep
Because tomorrow might be good
For something
Hold on feeling like I’m heading for a
Break down and I dunno why
I’m not crazy
I’m just a little unwell
I know right now you can’t tell
But stay awhile and maybe then You’ll see
A different side of me
I’m not crazy
I’m just a little impaired
I know right now you don’t care
But soon enough you’re gonna think of me
And how I used to be
Talking to myself in public
And dulging glances on the train
And I know I know that they ‘ve all been talking about me
I can hear their whisper
And it makes me feel that there must be something wrong with me
After all the hours thinking somehow I‘ve lost my mind
I’m not crazy
I’m just a little unwell
I know right now you can’t tell
But stay awhile and maybe then you’ll see
A different side of me
I’m not crazy
I’m just a little impaired
I know right now you don’t care
But soon enough you’re gonna think of me
And how I used to be
I’ve been talking in my sleep
Soon they’ll come to get me
And they’re taking me away
I’m not crazy
I’m just a little unwell
I know right now you can’t tell
But stay awhile and maybe then you’ll see
A different side of me
I’m not crazy
I’m just a little impaired I know
Right now you don’t care
But soon enough you’re gonna think of me
And how I used to be
And how I used to be
How I used to be
I’m just a little lonely
How I used to be
How I used to be
I’m just a little unwell

windows 7 secret tricks

Lately I installed windows 7 on my xps 1210 and its awesome. I had been discovering small tricks in win 7 and then I stumbled upon to this mega tricks list of the OS on msdn blogs.

Enjoy.

  1. Windows Management. By now, you’ve probably seen that Windows 7 does a lot to make window management easier: you can “dock” a window to the left or right half of the screen by simply dragging it to the edge; similarly, you can drag the window to the top of the screen to maximize it, and double-click the window top / bottom border to maximize it vertically with the same horizontal width. What you might not know is that all these actions are also available with keyboard shortcuts:
    • Win+Left Arrow and Win+Right Arrow dock;
    • Win+Up Arrow and Win+Down Arrow maximizes and restores / minimizes;
    • Win+Shift+Up Arrow and Win+Shift+Down Arrow maximizes and restores the vertical size.

    This side-by-side docking feature is particularly invaluable on widescreen monitors – it makes the old Windows way of shift-clicking on two items in the taskbar and then using the context menu to arrange them feel really painful.

  2. Display Projection. Had enough of messing around with weird and wonderful OEM display driver utilities to get your notebook display onto an external projector? In that case, you’ll be pleased to know that projection is really quick and simple with Windows 7. Just hit Win+P, and you’ll be rewarded by the following pop-up window:
    The Win+P Projector Settings window allows you to quickly switch display settings.
    Use the arrow keys (or keep hitting Win+P) to switch to “clone”, “extend” or “external only” display settings. You can also access the application as displayswitch.exe.If you want broader control over presentation settings, you can also press Win+X to open the Windows Mobility Center, which allows you to turn on a presentation “mode” that switches IM clients to do not disturb, disables screensavers, sets a neutral wallpaper etc. (Note that this feature is also available in Windows Vista.)
  3. Cut Out The Clutter. Working on a document in a window and want to get rid of all the extraneous background noise? Simply hit Win+Home to minimize all the non-active background windows, keeping the window you’re using in its current position. When you’re ready, simply press Win+Home again to restore the background windows to their original locations.
  4. Multi-Monitor Windows Management. The earlier tip on window management showed how you can dock windows within a monitor. One refinement of those shortcuts is that you can use Win+Shift+Left Arrow and Win+Shift+Right Arrow to move windows from one monitor to another – keeping them in the same relative location to the monitor’s top-left origin.
  5. Command Junkies Only. One of the most popular power toys in Windows XP was “Open Command Prompt Here”, which enabled you to use the graphical shell to browse around the file system and then use the context menu to open a command prompt at the current working directory. In Windows 7 (and in Windows Vista, incidentally – although not many folk knew about it), you can simply hold the Shift key down while selecting the context menu to get exactly the same effect. If the current working directory is a network location, it will automatically map a drive letter for you.
  6. It’s a Global Village. If you’ve tried to change your desktop wallpaper, you’ve probably noticed that there’s a set of wallpapers there that match the locale you selected when you installed Windows. (If you picked US, you’ll see beautiful views of Crater Lake in Oregon, the Arches National Park, a beach in Hawai’i, etc.) In fact, there are several sets of themed wallpapers installed based on the language you choose, but the others are in a hidden directory. If you’re feeling in an international mood, simply browse to C:\Windows\Globalization\MCT and you’ll see a series of pictures under the Wallpaper directory for each country. Just double-click on the theme file in the Theme directory to display a rotation through all the pictures for that country. (Note that some countries contain a generic set of placeholder art for now.)
  7. The Black Box Recorder. Every developer wishes there was a way that an end-users could quickly and simply record a repro for the problem that they’re running into that is unique to their machine. Windows 7 comes to the rescue! Part of the in-built diagnostic tools that we use internally to send feedback on the product, the Problem Steps Recorder provides a simple screen capture tool that enables you to record a series of actions. Once you hit “record”, it tracks your mouse and keyboard and captures screenshots with any comments you choose to associate alongside them. Once you stop recording, it saves the whole thing to a ZIP file, containing an HTML-based “slide show” of the steps. It’s a really neat little tool and I can’t wait for it to become ubiquitous on every desktop! The program is called psr.exe; you can also search for it from Control Panel under “Record steps to reproduce a problem”.
    The Problem Steps Recorder provides an easy way for users to record a problem repro for later diagnosis.

more secrets and tricks

Google go

GoogleGo.jpg

The Go Web site (golang.org) explains the rationale behind creating Go, mostly citing the change of the computer landscape that’s occurred over the past decade or so that’s seen very few (if any) major systems languages spring up: more powerful PCs, many of which use multicore processors; increased dependency management in software that’s not reflected in the “header files” of C-based languages; the growing desire for dynamically typed languages (such as Python and JavaScript) instead of type systems such as Java and C++); and the poor support for concepts such as garbage collection and parallel computation.

Google says that [continue reading…]

Mac OS evolution

macevo

Witness the evolution through time of Macintosh’s operating system, Mac OS. See where it all began, from System 1.0 (1984) to Mac OS X 10.5 (2007).

System 1.0 (January 1984)

s10

main

The first version of the Mac OS is easily distinguished between other operating systems from the same period because it does not use a command line interface; it was one of the first operating systems to use an entirely graphical user interface. Additional to the system kernel is the Finder, an application used for file management, which also displays the Desktop.

These releases could only run one application at a time, though special application shells such as Switcher could work around this to some extent. Systems 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 used a flat file system with only one kludged level of folders, called Macintosh File System (MFS); its support for folders (subdirectories) was incomplete. System 2.1 (Finder 5.0) introduced the HFS (Hierarchical File System) which had real directories. System 3.0 was introduced with the Mac Plus, adding support for several new technologies including SCSI and AppleTalk, and introducing Trash “bulging”, i.e., when the Trash contained files, it would gain a bulged appearance. System 4.0 came with the Mac SE and Macintosh II.

The System series included the following versions:

  • System 1.0, Finder 1.0 (January 1984)
  • System 1.1, Finder 1.1g (May 1984)
  • System 2.0, Finder 4.1 (April 1985)
  • System 2.1, Finder 5.0 (September 1985)
  • System 3.0, Finder 5.1 (January 1986)
  • System 3.2, Finder 5.3 (June 1986)
  • System 3.3, Finder 5.4 (January 1987)
  • System 3.4, Finder 6.1
  • System 4.0, Finder 5.4 (March 1987)
  • System 4.1, Finder 5.5 (April 1987)

System Software 5 (October 1987)

mac_s5

System Software 5 (also referred to as simply System 5) added MultiFinder, an extension which let the system run several programs at once. The system used a co-operative multitasking model, meaning that time was given to the background applications only when the running application yielded control. A clever change in system functions that applications were already calling to handle events made many existing applications share time automatically. Users could also choose to not use MultiFinder, and thus stick with using a single application at a time as in previous releases of the system software.

System Software 5 was also the first Macintosh operating system to be given a unified “Macintosh System Software” version number, as opposed to the numbers used for the System and Finder files.

The System Software 5 series included the following versions:

  • System Software 5.0 (System 4.2, Finder 6.0, MultiFinder 1.0)
  • System Software 5.1 (System 4.3, Finder 6.0, MultiFinder 1.0)

System Software 6 (September 1988)

system6

System Software 6 (also referred to as simply System 6) was a consolidation release of the Mac OS, producing a complete, stable, and long-lasting operating system.

The System Software 6 series included the following versions:

  • System Software 6.0 (System 4.4, Finder 6.1, MultiFinder 1.1 — the version numbers of the System and MultiFinder files were changed to 6.0 just before the public release)
  • System Software 6.0.1
  • System Software 6.0.2
  • System Software 6.0.3
  • System Software 6.0.4
  • System Software 6.0.5
  • System Software 6.0.6 (only released as an embedded part of the ROM of the Macintosh Classic)
  • System Software 6.0.7
  • System Software 6.0.8 (identical to System 6.0.7, but configured with System 7.0 printing software for printer sharing with System 7)
  • System Software 6.0.8L (only for Macintosh Classic, Classic II, PowerBook 100, Macintosh LC, LC II)

System 7 (May 1991)

system7

On May 13, 1991 System 7 was released. It was the second major upgrade to the Mac OS, adding a significant user interface overhaul, new applications, stability improvements and many new features.

The most significant feature of System 7 was probably virtual memory support, which previously had only been available as a third-party add-on. Accompanying this was a move to 32-bit memory addressing, necessary for the ever-increasing amounts of RAM available. Earlier versions of Mac OS had used the lower 24 bits for addressing, and the upper 8 bits for flags. This had been an effective solution for earlier Macintosh models with very limited amounts of RAM, but it became a liability later. Apple described code that assumed the 24 + 8-bit addressing as being “not 32-bit clean”, and most such applications would crash when 32-bit addressing was enabled by the user.

One notable System 7 feature was the built-in co-operative multitasking. In System Software 6, this function was optional through the MultiFinder. System 7 also introduced aliases, similar to shortcuts that were introduced in later versions of Microsoft Windows. System extensions were enhanced, by being moved to their own subfolder; a subfolder in the System Folder was also created for the control panels. In System 7.5, Apple included the Extensions Manager, a previously third-party program which simplified the process of enabling and disabling extensions.

Systems 7.1 and 7.5 introduced a large number of “high level” additions, considered by some to be less well thought-out than they could have been. Some of the most confusing were the reliance on countless System Enablers to support new hardware, and various System update extensions with inconsistent version numbering schemes. Overall stability and performance also gradually worsened during this period, which introduced PowerPC support and 68K emulation.

Stability returned with Mac OS 7.6, which dropped the “System” moniker as a more-trademarkable name was needed in order to license the OS to the growing market of third-party Macintosh clone manufacturers.

The System 7 series included the following versions:

  • System 7.0 (released in late 1991; integrated MultiFinder always enabled)
  • System 7.0.1 (introduced with LC II and Quadra series)
  • System 7 Tuner (update for both 7.0 and 7.0.1)
  • System 7.1
  • System 7.1 Pro (version 7.1.1, combined with PowerTalk, Speech Manager & Macintalk, Thread Manager)
  • System 7.1.2 (first version for Macs equipped with a PowerPC processor)
  • System 7.1.2 (only for Performa/LC/Quadra 630 series, very quickly replaced by 7.5)
  • System 7.5
  • System 7.5.1 (System 7.5 Update 1.0 — the first Macintosh operating system to call itself “Mac OS”)
  • System 7.5.2 (first version for Power Macs that use PCI expansion cards, usable only on these Power Macs and PowerBooks 5300 and Duo 2300)
  • System 7.5.3 (System 7.5 Update 2.0)
  • System 7.5.3L (only for Mac clones)
  • System 7.5.3 Revision 2
  • System 7.5.3 Revision 2.1 (only for Performa 6400/180 and 6400/120)
  • System 7.5.4, never released
  • System 7.5.5
  • Mac OS 7.6 (name formally changed because of the experimental clone program, although System 7.5.1 and later used the “Mac OS” name on the splash screen)
  • Mac OS 7.6.1

Mac OS 8 (July 1997)

macos8

Mac OS 8 was released on July 26, 1997, shortly after Steve Jobs returned to the company. It was mainly released to keep the Mac OS moving forward during a difficult time for Apple. Initially planned as Mac OS 7.7, it was renumbered “8″ to exploit a legal loophole to accomplish Jobs’ goal of terminating third-party manufacturers’ licenses to System 7 and shutting down the Macintosh clone market.[citation needed] 8.0 added a number of features from the stillborn Copland project, while leaving the underlying operating system unchanged. A multi-threaded Finder was included, enabling better multi-tasking. The GUI was changed in appearance to a new shaded greyscale look called Platinum, and the ability to change the appearance themes (also known as skins) was added with a new control panel. This capability was provided by a new “appearance” API layer within the OS, one of the few significant changes.

Apple sold 1.2 million copies of Mac OS 8 in its first two weeks of availability and 3 million within six months. Mac OS 8.1 saw the introduction of an updated version of the Hierarchical File System called HFS Plus , which fixed many of the limitations of the earlier system (HFS Plus continues to be used in Mac OS X). There were some other interface changes such as separating network features from printing (the venerable, and rather odd Chooser was at last headed for retirement), and some improvements to application switching. However, in underlying technical respects, Mac OS 8 was not very different from System 7.

The Mac OS 8 series included the following versions:

  • Mac OS 8.0
  • Mac OS 8.1 (last version to run on either a 68K or PowerPC processor, added support for USB on the Bondi iMac, added support for HFS+)
  • Mac OS 8.5 (first version to run only on a PowerPC processor, added built-in support for Firewire on the PowerMac G3)
  • Mac OS 8.5.1
  • Mac OS 8.6 (included a new nanokernel for improved performance and Multiprocessing Services 2.0 support, added support for the PowerPC G4 processor)

Mac OS 9 (October 1999)

macos9

macos90-1-1

Mac OS 9 was released on October 23, 1999. It was generally a steady evolution from Mac OS 8. Early development releases of Mac OS 9 were numbered 8.7. MacOS 9 added improved support for AirPort wireless networking. It introduced an early implementation of multi-user support (though not considered a true multi-user operating system by modern standards). An improved find-sherlock engine with several new search plug-ins. Mac OS 9 also provided a much improved memory implementation and management. AppleScript was improved to allow TCP/IP and networking control. Mac OS 9 also made the first use of the centralized Apple Software Update to find and install OS and hardware updates. Some other resplendent and unique features included its on-the-fly file encryption software with code signing and Keychain technologies, Remote Networking and File Server packages and much improved list of USB drivers.

OS 9 also added some transitional technologies to help application developers adopt some OS X features before the introduction of the new OS to the public, again easing the transition. These included new APIs for the file system, and the bundling of the Carbon library that apps could link against instead of the traditional API libraries — apps that were adapted to do this can be run natively on OS X as well. Other changes were made in OS 9 to allow it to be booted in the “classic environment” within OS X. This is a compatibility layer in OS X (in fact an OS X application, known in developer circles as “the blue box”) that runs a complete Mac OS 9 operating system, so allowing applications that have not been ported to Carbon to run on Mac OS X. This is reasonably seamless, though “classic” applications retain their original OS 8/9 appearance and do not gain the OS X “Aqua” appearance.

The Mac OS 9 series included the following versions:

  • Mac OS 9.0
  • Mac OS 9.0.2
  • Mac OS 9.0.3
  • Mac OS 9.0.4
  • Mac OS 9.1
  • Mac OS 9.2
  • Mac OS 9.2.1
  • Mac OS 9.2.2

Mac OS X (March 2001)

mac-os-x

tiger_01

Mac OS X is the newest of Apple Computer’s Mac OS line of operating systems. Although it is officially designated as simply “version 10″ of the Mac OS, it has a history largely independent of the earlier Mac OS releases.

The Mac OS X series include the following versions:

  • Mac OS X Public Beta “Kodiak”
  • Mac OS X v10.0 “Cheetah”
  • Mac OS X v10.1 “Puma”
  • Mac OS X v10.2 “Jaguar”
  • Mac OS X v10.3 “Panther”
  • Mac OS X v10.4 “Tiger”
  • Mac OS X v10.5 “Leopard”
  • Mac OS X v 10.6 “Snow leopard”

snowlepord

We had surround sound now welcome “Surround-sight”

Expand your view of gaming, productivity, and entertainment and discover a new realm of panoramic computing with ATI Eyefinity advanced multiple-display technology. With the introduction of new GPUs from AMD which are compliant with next-generation DirectX® 11, ATI Eyefinity technology with DisplayPort connectivity, enables a single GPU to support up to six independent display outputs simultaneously. Boost everyday productivity, and ease multitasking with a vastly expanded visual workspace. Intensify gaming with ultra-immersive playing environments, and expand your entertainment landscape with a breathtaking field-of-view. Offering easy configuration and flexible upgradability, the innovative graphics capabilities of ATI Eyefinity multiple-display technology helps dissolve visual limitations and adds a new “surround-sight” sensation to your PC experience.

ATI Radeon™ HD 4890Operate up to six high-resolution displays simultaneously and independently, flexibly configured in various combinations of landscape and portrait orientations. Group multiple monitors into a large integrated display surface, enabling windowed and full-screen 3D applications, images, and video to span across multiple displays as one desktop workspace. ATI Eyefinity advanced multiple-display technology supports Duplicated Mode operation (PC desktop cloned on multiple displays) and Extended Mode (PC desktop extended across multiple displays), and offers comprehensive operating system support that includes Windows® 7, Windows Vista®, and Linux.

Gaming

Immerse yourself in game play:

  • Get a commanding view of the action, and enjoy more control in real-time strategy games.
  • Detect enemies sooner, react faster, and survive longer in first-person-shooter games.
  • See enemy aircraft with peripheral vision, and fly with greater spatial awareness in flight combat simulators.
  • Eliminate blind spots and feel a heightened sense of speed in racing games.

Productivity

Helps you get more done:

  • Optimize productivity by increasing PC desktop workspace with multiple high-resolution monitors.
  • Manage multitasking more efficiently, and view more data, applications, and images at once.
  • Avoid time-wasting application-switching, window-sorting, mouse-clicking, and scrolling.
  • Improve accuracy, speed workflow, reduce eyestrain, and increase work satisfaction.

Entertainment

Maximize your leisure time:

  • Group multiple monitors into a large integrated display surface for the ultimate wide-screen home theater display.
  • View TV sports, movies, or video entertainment on one monitor while viewing online stats, Internet pages, or games on other displays.3
  • Flexibly configure monitors in various combinations of landscape and portrait orientations for specialized video and audio editing applications.

Using ATI Eyefinity

ATI Eyefinity is defined as two or more display outputs operating simultaneously and independently from each other. Support is available for Duplicated (Clone) and Extended multiple monitor modes, with new support for the capability to group displays into a massive single large surface spanning across multiple displays for use with your desktop workspace, video playback, with support for both windowed and full screen 3D applications.

Below are some of key usage scenarios:

ATI Radeon™ HD 4890 ATI Radeon™ HD 4890
3×1 Portrait Display Group 3×1 Landscape Display Group
ATI Radeon™ HD 4890 ATI Radeon™ HD 4890
3×1 Display Group Plus 1 Extended 3×2 Landscape Display Group
ATI Radeon™ HD 4890 ATI Radeon™ HD 4890
3×1 Display Group Plus 3 Extended 2×2 Display Group Plus 2 Extended

Google wave

Google Wave is “a personal communication and collaboration tool” announced by Google at the Google I/O conference on May 27, 2009. It is a web-based service, computing platform, and communications protocol designed to merge e-mail, instant messaging, wiki, and social networking. It has a strong collaborative and real-time focus supported by extensions that can provide, for example, robust spelling/grammar checking, automated translation between 40 languages, and numerous other extensions. It was announced in Google’s official blog on July 20, 2009, that the preview of Google Wave would be extended to about 100,000 users on September 30, 2009.

Its October 2, 09 and I am still waiting for my wave invitation 🙂

Google Wave is designed as the next generation of Internet communication. It is written in Java using OpenJDK; its web interface uses the Google Web Toolkit. Instead of sending a message and its entire thread of previous messages or requiring all responses to be stored in each user’s inbox for context, objects known as waves contain a complete thread of multimedia messages (blips) and are located on a central server. Waves are shared and collaborators can be added or removed at any point during a wave’s existence.

Waves, described by Google as “equal parts conversation and document”, are hosted XML documents that allow seamless and low latency concurrent modifications. Any participant of a wave can reply anywhere in the message, edit the content and add participants at any point in the process. Users can reply to blips within waves. Recipients are notified of changes/replies in all waves they are active in and then view the changes when they subsequently access a given wave. In addition, waves are live. All replies/edits are seen real-time, letter by letter, as they are typed by the other collaborators. Multiple participants may edit a single wave simultaneously in Google Wave. Thus, waves not only can function as e-mail and threaded conversations but also as an instant messaging service, merging the functions of e-mail and instant messaging. It depends only on whether both users are online at the same time or not, allowing a wave to even shift repeatedly between e-mail and instant messaging depending on the user’s needs. The ability to show messages as they are typed can also be disabled, similar to conventional instant messaging.

The ability to modify a wave at any location lets users create collaborative documents, edited in a manner akin to wikis.

The history of each wave is stored within it. Collaborators may use a playback feature in Google Wave to observe the order which a wave was edited, blips were added, and who was responsible for what in the wave. The history may also be searched by a user to view and/or modify specific changes, such as specific kinds of changes or messages from a single user.

Google Wave is still in active development. It is expected to continue to be so until later in 2009, launching to about 100,000 users on 30th September. Google Wave access can be requested. Developers have been given access to Wave proper, and all wave users invited by Google can invite up to 8 others. Those who receive indirect invitations (were invited by someone who was invited by Google) will not be able to invite others. As of October 1st, Google Wave testers were unable to add extensions because “settings” is under construction.